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Beware, Coronavirus Maps Using Malware to Steal Your Password and Sensitive Data
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Beware, Coronavirus Maps Using Malware to Steal Your Password and Sensitive Data

by Aiman MaulanaMarch 16, 2020
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Beware, Coronavirus Maps Using Malware to Steal Your Password and Sensitive Data 18

The current COVID-19 outbreak continues to grow and naturally, people would want to stay up to date as a measure to protect themselves. Whenever something is in the limelight, there will always be an opportunist lurking however, as hackers have planted malware in Coronavirus maps and other applications.

There is a PC software secretly spreading malware labeled “Corona-virus-Map.com.exe” under the guise of a Coronavirus map. The malware has the ability to steal user data such as usernames, passwords, credit card details, and others that are stored in web browsers.

What Malware is Plaguing the Coronavirus Maps?

Beware, Coronavirus Maps Using Malware to Steal Your Password and Sensitive Data

The malware in question has been identified as AZORult, which has been around since 2016. An infected PC would allow a hacker to steal passwords, cookies, browser history, cryptocurrency keys, and other important data. Moreover, it is also capable of downloading more malware, thus making the situation even worse. Interestingly, it’s said to be capable of stealthily creating an account with admin access on the infected PC, which will then allow for remote access by cybercriminals.

This false app looks legit at first, especially since it looks similar to the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Centre map. The file, which is roughly 3MB in size, will create duplicates of the aforementioned app name, Corona.exe. Bin.exe, Build.exe, and Windows.Globalization.Fontgroups.exe.

According to Reason Labs’ cybersecurity researcher, Shai Alfasi, there are APIs that decrypt saved password from infected web browsers, which are then moved to a temporary folder. It is also capable of stealing login data of online accounts like Steam. The process will happy automatically as soon as users execute the file. It is recommended to use Antivirus software to get rid of the malware, although no specific ones were mentioned.

How bad do you think the situation is? Join the discussion right below here:

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Pokdepinion: Whenever there is something to fear, there will always be an opportunist. Stay safe, everyone.

About The Author
Aiman Maulana
Jack of all trades, master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one. YouTuber, video editor, tech head, and a wizard of gaming. What's up? :)

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