ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review – A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor

Low Boon Shen
8 Min Read
ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review – A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor
  • Appearance - 8.5/10
    8.5/10
  • Features - 8/10
    8/10
  • Materials - 8/10
    8/10
  • Performance - 7.8/10
    7.8/10
  • Portability - 8.7/10
    8.7/10
  • User Experience - 8/10
    8/10
  • Value - 8.2/10
    8.2/10

Summary

The ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 is a straightforward, simple multi-device Bluetooth keyboard with a bit of creative flair – but it’s missing some features that frequent typists may appreciate.

Overall
8.2/10
8.2/10

Pros

+ Long-lasting battery runtime
+ Lightweight
+ Relatively silent keystroke
+ Wide OS compatibility, multi-device support
+ Colorful

Cons

– No 2.4GHz option
– No backlighting
– Thick Z-height may affect typing experience

Unboxing

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review

The packaging for the ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 has eliminated nearly all plastics, with the paper-based material wrapping the keyboard the first time you unbox it. This unit we have comes with the color (or flavor?) of Oat Milk – there’s also Green Tea Latte version available. Neither are edible though, just to be absolutely clear. 

It doesn’t contain much inside, which includes three items:

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review - A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor 6

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review - A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor 6

  • Quick start guide
  • Warranty information
  • ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100

Specifications

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100

Body material Plastic, 75% form factor
Keycap UV-coated plastic
Connectivity Bluetooth 5.0
USB report rate Unspecified
Switch type Ultra low-profile, scissor-switch
1.6mm key travel
10 million keystroke endurance
N-Key Rollover (NKRO) Unspecified
Anti-ghosting Unspecified
OS Support Windows 10,Windows 11, ChromeOS, macOS, iOS, iPadOS
Battery 2x AAA 1.5V, max. 24 months runtime
Colors Oat Milk (As tested)
Green Tea Latte
Dimensions 282 x 130 x 18.4 mm
Weight 374.8g

User Experience

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review - A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor 7

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review - A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor 7

While the keyboard comes in with the exact same keyboard layout you’d find in laptops, it’s not necessarily the easiest to pick up the pace due to its rather thick Z-height (thickness). At 18.4mm, this is thicker than even some laptops on its entirety – and this is worsened by the fact that unlike laptops which comes with a deck area acting as a palm rest to support your wrist, your hand is now dealing with a rather unusual position simply as the wrist is now physically a lot lower than usual.

If you’re coming from laptops, there’s a good chance you might need some form of palm rest or at least a flat surface that raises the pivot point of your wrist, which should greatly improve your typing pace. Granted, I’m not exactly fast when it comes to typing (I average at 70WPM, peaks at ~85WPM), but I can only reliably maintain around 60WPM with the extra thickness I’m dealing with.

The Good

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review - A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor 8

ASUS Marshmallow Keyboard KW100 Review - A Compact Keyboard, With A Touch Of Flavor 8

First off, this keyboard has a good compatibility support with OS support across Microsoft’s Windows 10/11, Apple’s macOS, iOS and iPadOS, plus even Google’s ChromeOS (which features a fairly different layout by default compared to Apple and Microsoft’s counterparts). There’s also no stopping you from using it in Android too – given that OS already comes with some form of external keyboard support.

As for the keystroke itself, ASUS has given it some soundproofing treatment with the addition of a foam layer below. This actually alters the keystroke noise to slightly resembling the “thocks” in custom mechanical keyboards, but in the scissor-switch form. Here’s the audio clip to give you an idea what it sounds like (note – I often type with more actuation force than most people do – just my habits – so you’ll hear plenty of bottom-outs):

Anyone who type with lighter actuation forces should get very silent noise levels, but worst-case it’s no louder than your usual laptop keyboards. The keyboard layout, at 75%, also exactly resembles a typical laptop layout with Fn keys, half-height Arrow Up/Down keys. Although in this case you do lose the Context Menu button – a feature very few people uses, much less in this kind of keyboards.