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Snapdragon 898 will be 20% faster, but just as hot as Snapdragon 888?
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Snapdragon 898 will be 20% faster, but just as hot as Snapdragon 888?

by Vyncent ChanAugust 13, 2021
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It seems that Qualcomm won’t be solving their heating issues anytime soon. While they are reportedly going to use a newer 4nm manufacturing process by Samsung, the next-gen Snapdragon 898 is reportedly going to be just as toasty as the current-gen Snapdragon 888.

Snapdragon 898: 20% faster, but just as hot

Snapdragon 898 performance hot sm8450

According to serial leaker Digital Chat Station on Weibo, the Snapdragon 898 will offer about 20% higher performance, but will still run rather hot like the Snapdragon 888 chipset. He also goes on to joke that it is a good thing that the Snapdragon 898 will be unveiled during winter. I guess you can buy a smartphone that doubles as a hand warmer.

The improved performance is probably thanks to the new architectures at play: the “prime” Cortex-X2 core, Cortex-A710 performance cores, and the Cortex-A510 efficiency cores. The Cortex-X2 architecture promises about 16% faster integer performance and twice the machine learning performance of the last-gen Cortex-X1.

While it goes without saying that Qualcomm is going to pack an even faster GPU in the Snapdragon 898, they might lose their lead in graphics performance though. Samsung partnered up with AMD to use the RDNA 2 graphics architecture in their upcoming Exynos chipsets. Leaked 3DMark results have revealed an Exynos chipset with the RDNA 2 GPU delivering 40% higher scores than the Snapdragon 888’s Adreno 660, even in early testing with a chipset featuring outdated Cortex-A77 CPU cores.

Snapdragon 888 chip

In any case, stay tuned for the Snapdragon Tech Summit that should be happening this December to find out more about the Snapdragon 898, or whatever Qualcomm decides to call their next-gen flagship chipset.

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Pokdepinion: Hopefully OEMs are willing to throttle more conservatively for a good user experience, instead of targeting flat out performance.

About The Author
Vyncent Chan
Technology enthusiast, casual gamer, pharmacy graduate. Strongly opposes proprietary standards and always on the look out for incredible bang-for-buck.